The musthave companion to Bill O'Reilly's historic series Legends and Lies: The Real West, a fascinating, eyeopening look at the truth behind the western legends we all think we knowHow did Davy Crockett save President Jackson's life only to end up dying at the Alamo? Was the Lone Ranger based on a real lawmanand was he an African American? What amazing detective work led to the capture of Black Bart, the gentleman bandit and one of the west's most famous stagecoach robbers? Did Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid really die in a hail of bullets in South America? Generations of Americans have grown up on TV shows, movies and books about these western icons But what really happened in the Wild West? All the stories you think you know, and others that will astonish you, are heresome heroic, some brutal and bloody, all riveting Included are the ten legends featured in Bill O'Reilly's Legends and Lies docuseries from Kit Carson to Jesse James, Wild Bill Hickok to Doc Holliday accompanied by two bonus chapters on Daniel Boone and Buffalo Bill and Annie OakleyFrontier America was a place where instinct mattered than education, and courage was necessary for survival It was a place where luck made a difference and legends were made Heavily illustrated with spectacular artwork that further brings this history to life, and told in fastpaced, immersive narrative, Legends and Lies is an irresistible, adventurepacked ride back into one of the most storied era of our nation's rich history


10 thoughts on “Bill O'Reilly's Legends and Lies: The Real West

  1. Jim Jim says:

    Move along folks...there's nothing to see here...if you are a western buff, that is. This is a garden variety selection of thumbnail biographies of figures of the old west. It's reasonably well-written and laid out, and I can't quibble with the celebrities Mr O'Reilly chose to grace the pages of his book. In fact, one might have predicted them, as he has rounded up a lot of the usual suspects like Billy the Kid, Doc Holliday, and the James boys. Wild Bill Hickock, of course, could not be left out, and Custer has his place here as well.

    I was happy to see Bass Reeves included...he is often left out of these literary roundups. Maybe he wasn't as flashy or infamous as some of his contemporaries, but as a black man enforcing the law in a white man's world on red man's land, he was fighting a double battle. Bass didn't like to resort to violence and arrested and jailed his own son for murder - now that's incorruptible!

    I did glean a few bits of western trivia from these pages. I was unaware, for example, that Annie Oakley had offered to raise a regiment of women soldiers to fight in WWI, thereby showing more sand than the American President. But revelations like this are rare gems in this book for one who reads a lot on the settling of the west; for someone starting out in the genre, this is a dandy book, clear and concise and richly illustrated.


  2. GymGuy GymGuy says:

    Nothing original here, rather a regurgitation and summary of what others have written. Little if any introspection. More of a series of little vignettes of famous and infamous personalities of the West. Good reading for 6th-9th graders, and probably good for a middle-school reading list because it does bring these people to life. But it's a rather shallow read for an adult. Can't really give it more than 3 stars.


  3. Krissys Krissys says:

    Bill O'Reilly's Legends and Lies: The Real West by David Fisher, Bill O'Reilly  
     
    Author: Bill O'Reilly
    Title: The Real West
    Series: Bill O'Reilly's Legends and Lies
    Cover Rating:

    Book Rating:

     
    Buy This Book:

     
     
     
     
     

     
    How did Davy Crockett save President Jackson's life only to end up dying at the Alamo? Was the Lone Ranger based on a real lawman-and was he an African American? What amazing detective work led to the capture of Black Bart, the gentleman bandit and one of the west's most famous stagecoach robbers?
    Did Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid really die in a hail of bullets in South America? Generations of Americans have grown up on TV shows, movies and books about these western icons. But what really happened in the Wild West?
    All the stories you think you know, and others that will astonish you, are here--some heroic, some brutal and bloody, all riveting. Included are the ten legends featured in Bill O'Reilly's Legends and Lies docuseries -from Kit Carson to Jesse James, Wild Bill Hickok to Doc Holliday-- accompanied by two bonus chapters on Daniel Boone and Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley.Frontier America was a place where instinct mattered more than education, and courage was necessary for survival. It was a place where luck made a difference and legends were made. Heavily illustrated with spectacular artwork that further brings this history to life, and told in fast-paced, immersive narrative,
    Legends and Lies is an irresistible, adventure-packed ride back into one of the most storied era of our nation's rich history.
     
     
     
     
     

    I wasn't as impressed by this book as I thought I would be.
    The accumulation of persons written about and the information that was included wasn't really anything new that isn't already known.
    Ignoring the misspelling and other errors it just wasn't that big a deal. Granted I've always been a fan of history figures I think I was just expecting something else when I got this book.
    Legends and Lies was recommended to me by a friend and it was good just wasn't great and didn't include any new information I hadn't already seen written by other authors. 
    If you haven't already read about this history or these historical figures before this will be a really great read but for those that have there isn't a whole lot of fresh information or perspective to discover.
     
     
     
    Until next time book lovers...

     

     

    Krissys Bookshelf Reviews purchased a print copy for personal collection. All thoughts, comments and ratings are my own.
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  4. Malinda Jarvis Malinda Jarvis says:

    Oh, really?

    First Boone was the 6th child, a few pages later he was the 7th. Kentucky is spelled Kentucke and Kentucky. Poor composition.


  5. Wesley Roth Wesley Roth says:

    The last two months I've enjoyed Bill O'Reilly's latest book on the Old West while watching DVRed episodes of the companion series on FOX NEWS (with my wife). I would highly recommend watching each episode THEN following up with reading the related chapter in the book for more of each person's story. Every chapter was a great summary of some of the great legends of the West: Jesse James, David Crockett, Doc Holliday, Billy the Kid. The chapters I found most interesting were of Bass Reeves, Davy Crockett and Black Bart. O'Reilly's book is a great primer to further explore each profiled figure more in-depth.


  6. Paul Paul says:

    O'Reilly has fooled me again. As previously with Killing Patton, the title is a come on. He simply rehashes all previous stories not some new insight as he would have you believe.


  7. Beth Beth says:

    A very informative & enjoyable listen, narrated by Tom Wopat.


  8. Erika B. (SOS BOOKS) Erika B. (SOS BOOKS) says:

    I loved this but I also really love and romanticize the Wild West. I grew up on John Wayne movies and live in the west so we celebrate it often. I was fascinated by these stories that I even went and watched the entire TV series that this is the companion to. A lot of reviewers on here are saying that this book is like reading Wikipedia and I think the reason it isn't that deep is because it is a support to the TV show and not the main entree. So-onto stories I loved. Jesse James is probably the most disturbing story because his mom literally bred him to be violent. The whole psychology behind that situation was fascinating and creepy. I think one of my favorite stories was Doc Holliday-who went out west when he discovered he was dying of consumption so he could die with his boots on. This expression means dying while doing something adventurous. He became a notorious gunfighter who survived many situations that he shouldn't have. Unfortunately consumption got the better of him and as he lay in bed on Nov 8th 1887, he supposedly awoke and asked in a clear voice for a glass of whiskey. He sighed, looked down at his bare feet, and commented, Damn, this is funny, and died.
    O my word history is so fun! Love it! I also loved the stories of Black Bart the gentleman robber who only stole from Wells Fargo wagons because they ticked him off after causing his gold claim to fail. After he would steal from the wagon train, he would walk back to San Francisco where he lead the life of a gentleman who made his money from mining. I loved him because he left poetry behind with his victims...like....
    I've labored long and hard for bread,
    For honor and for riches
    But on my corns too long you've tread
    You fine-haired sons-of-bitches.

    It's this wild, lawlessness that is truly so fun to learn about. It's guns blazing and survival of the fittest. America's history is just filled with these colorful human characters and I think it's our job to go out and discover them.

    Erika's Amazon Link


  9. Kayla Holthe Kayla Holthe says:

    Well... It was a good book if you can overlook inaccuracies, editorial misses and just the same ole stories we know, and really not written well.

    I'm a huge fan of American history. Huge! But I found this book 'half written'. They left a lot out and the writing wasn't very good. It's like he tried to be funny, but it didn't really work.

    Based on the title 'Legends and Lies'; I was expecting some juicy stuff that I haven't heard before and some commonly known 'facts' to be debunked. Not at all. It was just parts of the stories of their lives, which is generally interesting enough. But this book fell far short for me.


  10. Dee Logan Dee Logan says:

    A computation of western legends but really nothing new has been covered except maybe the fact about the Lone Ranger - he didn't have a white horse/black outfit but maybe I'm mixing up with Hopalong Cassidy? I was intrigued by the fact that he could have been of black descent which I hadn't thought about but is very possible. A quick read.